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Showing posts from June, 2012

Douglas Coupland's GENERATION A

"Now you young twerps want a new name for your generation? Probably not, you just want jobs, right? Well, the media do us all such tremendous favors when they call you Generation X, right? Two clicks from the very end of the alphabet. I hereby declare you Generation A, as much at the beginning of a series of astonishing triumphs and failures as Adam and Eve were so long ago." — Kurt Vonnegut

After many years of recommendations and the associated build-up, I’ve finally done it:  I read my first Douglas Coupland book.  Does he live up to the hype?  Well...
Generation A tells a tale of a strange and alternate Earth, one where the bees have mysteriously disappeared.  As such, some of the things that we take for granted now are gone, like flowers and apples and such. 
We are told the story from the perspectives of 5 different people around the world.  There’s Zack, a somehow model-esque redneck farmboy from Iowa.  Harj, a customer services operator based out of India for the almight…

A Pixel in God's Eyes

The other night, our church hosted a small gathering that was dubbed, “Theology on Tap”.  The idea was to head to a pub, somewhere casual and just talk theology.  Some points of discussion included the simplicity of God and also the grandness of God or the “Godness of God”, as our pastor quipped.  One person remarked that despite the grandness and infiniteness of God, that you, as a finite being, still matter.
During the discussion, I was trying to process some points and understand things in terms of geek analogies.
I started wondering if God sees the world in full high definition 1080p, and at the bare minimum, with a  refresh rate of 60 Hz.  At the same time, how each of us is like a single pixel on that globally expansive LED screen.  Our job as a pixel is simple; we are called to emit a light.  The light you emit can be of various colours and although you may be just a single pixel emitting a certain colour at a certain time, combined with all the other pixels surrounding you, you …

Seth Grahame-Smith's UNHOLY NIGHT

From the mind that brought you Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter comes the new literary classic Unholy Night.  Much like AL:VH, Unholy Night takes a fictional spin on real world stories and characters.  Author Seth Grahame-Smith’s latest epic brings us on a journey alongside some of the Bible’s lesser known characters.
Unholy Night is the “untold story” of the Three Wise Men.  It enlightens us on some of the lesser known details relating to the nativity story.  We follow a renowned thief named Balthazar, dubbed “the Antioch Ghost”, one who has gained notoriety by robbing bureaucrats and politicians, all the while evading the Empire and making a mockery of them.  As such, he is the bane of King Herod’s existence.  After a mishap in one of his pursuits, he is caught and thrown into prison where he is joined by two other thieves.  The three men are sentenced to death, but Balthazar and his quick wits have other plans.  After pulling off the ol’ Loonie Tunes switcheroo, the three men escape …

Tales of Vesperia (Xbox 360)

Amidst the shooters that have dominated the play space in the past while, I found reprieve with Tales of Vesperia, a Japanese RPG that was originally released in America in 2008.  


Tales of Vesperia follows Yuri, a former-knight turned rebel who starts off the tale chasing down a thief who’s stolen a magical artifact (referred to in the world as blastia) from his city.  Yuri tracks down the thief alongside with his trusty pipe-smoking dog, Repede.  In the middle of this mini-saga, you are joined by a doe eyed princess and a valiant hearted young hunter.  Like all good adventures (and pretty much every Japanese adventure!), what starts off as a small adventure spirals off into an enormous affair.  Your party becomes entrenched in a rivalry between the Empire and the free people (called the guilds), amidst a cosmic ballet of magic.
The game is an epic adventure, to say the least, requiring around 40 hours to complete the journey.  But that is to be expected, especially in the Japanese rol…