Skip to main content

To The Moon!!!




When I first saw the trailer for To the Moon, I was floored.  Its 3 minute promo elicited more emotions in a game than anything I’ve played in the past 3 years.  And it was a 16-bit RPG!  From everything I saw, it was a win.  But did it meet those fanboy expectations?

In To the Moon, you “play” as two memory scientists who are part of a company called the Sigmund Corporation.  The Sigmund Corporation specializes in diving into patient’s memories and changing their attitudes and aspirations by changing their memories.  They are hired by a dying, elderly man named Johnny Wyles who’s one dream in life was to go to the moon.  Our scientists travel back in time through his memories to find out more about this aspiration and make his dream come true – at least in memory.  Through this journey back in time, we are taken through a drama that involves friendships, romance and relationships. 

To the Moon is a storied experience developed by Freebird Games and released in the latter part of 2011.  To call To the Moon a game would be a very loose and arguable statement.  It is not really a game in the conventional sense.  You’re never really challenged and there are no odds that you’re to overcome.  It is more of a storytelling experience, under the guise of a 16-bit RPG.  The experience is heavily authored.  Those looking for an in-depth and challenging gaming experience need to turn away, this isn’t for you. 

Story here is the goal, not gameplay or mechanics.  You move, point and click at things.  Once in a blue moon, you need to solve a picture puzzle to progress further.  That is pretty much the extent of gameplay.  The vast majority of the game is watching characters and reading text.  Early on in the game, it even teases the player that there might be combat (but there is none to be found).

I’m at odds with how I feel about the experience.  I mean, when I sit down to game, I want to game.  When I want to read a book, I'll read a book.  When I want to see a movie, I'll see a movie.  I don’t know if I was bamboozled, but I didn’t get what I expected.  But the story, although sort of Inception-y, was interesting.  As a game though, I wanted more and unfortunately, there was not a hook.

That said, the soundtrack is delightful, and to me, is probably the most memorable aspect about the game.  For a game that spans around 4 hours, they do well in establishing a memorable theme that’s intertwined with the story as well.  The soundtrack is a wonderful homage to the 16-bit era.

For me, overall it was thumbs in the middle experience.  I can’t give it a hard recommend, but if you’re curious enough with what the story is about, it wouldn’t hurt.  I guess on the plus side, it’s only $10 (I got it for $8 on sale on Steam though!) and will only eat up 3-4 hours of your time.  Til next time, later geeks.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Science of God

Not too long ago, two of my friends had posted their thoughts on evolution and creationism. Both friends shared similar sentiments on the topic (you can view Skylar's here and Keith's here). Coincidence or not, shortly before they made their postings, I purchased a book called The Science of God by Dr. Gerald Schroeder, which was based on the same topic. Unfortunately, at the time of my friend's postings, I had not finished the book, but now I have.

In The Science of God, Schroeder attempts to debunk the dichotomy that exists between science/evolution and creationism. He tries to show that there can exist a duality between the two and that discoveries in science actually prove the story of creation in the bible.

The book can be roughly divided into three categories that being the concepts of time, the second with the biology of evolution, and lastly the concept of free will.

In describing time, he focuses on the 6 days that are explained in the beginning of Genesis. Duri…

DTV Madness: Jack Brooks - M.S. and Gingerdead Man 2

Okay, honestly, I think this will be the last DTV post for a while. One man can only take so much shit. I'm only human, I have feelings too. These two movies pushed my limit. I'm going to be in DTV-detox for the next month or so.

Jack Brooks: Monster Slayer

I thought that with a title like this, it couldn't fail. I thought that with a poster like they had, it couldn't fail. Then I realized something... I failed. I failed in thinking that this movie had any hope.

I was expecting some fun horror, mixed with comedy in sort of a Buffy the Vampire Slayer kind of fashion with a bumbling hero and smart quips. I mean, with a title like Jack Brooks: Monster Slayer, was I wrong in expecting a variety of monsters get slayed as the title suggests?

It didn't help much that the monsters looked uber cheesy. They looked like something right out of a Power Rangers episode. But to their credit, at least they stuck with practical make-up and effects rather than CG.

The movie its…

MAX PAYNE was oh so PAYNEFUL!!!

What a failure this was. An EPIC FAILURE~! And I'll tell you why. This movie had everything going for it which was why it made the failure seem so huge. It had star power. It had a very competent director. The visual style was there. It had a simple storyline... a storyline that was basically fuck-proof because it's so basic. The effects (when there were any) were also pretty great. So where did they go wrong?

Pacing.

If the first two-thirds of the film was like the last third, I think it would have been a fine film. Not great by any means, but fine. I mean, there was hardly any action in the first hour. It was all talk and build up. Every 5 minutes I was saying to myself, "okay, something cool is gonna happen now". But it never came. I think had they added 2 or 3 big action sequences during that hour, that it would have helped the film breathe and flow better. I mean, didn't they realize that the source material was an action game?

Max Payne is based…